RICS new Homebuyer Report

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors has launched a new survey report, designed to focus on the needs of the consumer with clear, simple and easy-to-follow information about the condition of a property.

Concise and user-friendly, the new HomeBuyer Report reflects changes in the home buying and selling process, assisting the purchaser in their decision by reporting on a property’s condition, value, need for repairs and replacements, and what further advice is required before exchanging contracts.

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Chartered Surveyor

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The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) is an independent, representative professional body which regulates property professionals and surveyors in the United Kingdom and other sovereign nations.

RICS provides education and training standards, protects consumers with strict codes of practice and advises governments and business.

The motto of RICS is “Est modus in rebus” (which translates into English as: “There is measure in all things”).

Entry to membership of the RICS is via four main routes: academic; graduate; technical; and senior professional. The RICS has links with a number of universities worldwide, with whom they have accredited approved courses which satisfy part of the qualification requirements to become trainee surveyors. The RICS also offers expedited routes to membership for qualified professional members of some partner associations.

Members must update their knowledge and competence during their working life through RICS’ Continuous Professional Development regulations so the advice they give will be of the highest and most professional standard.

Source: Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. (2009, January 28). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_Institution_of_Chartered_Surveyors&oldid=266926845

Concrete Defects

Between 1900 and the early 1950s (mid 1960s in certain areas) many properties in Cornwall and parts of Devon were built with concrete constructed of poor quality aggregate from mining waste.

This aggregate was readily available at a minimal cost from the waste tips of old mines throughout the South West.

Unfortunately it has now been established that the minerals contained in the aggregate material can cause a chemical reaction which results in deterioration of the strength and composition of the concrete.

Not all buildings of that era are suspect. Many of the concrete blocks were made from good quality materials such as the course waste product from china clay workings, but as a result mortgage lenders now insist that properties built of mass concrete or block construction are tested if constructed prior to or around the early/mid 1950’s.

Inspections are carried out in accordance with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors Guidelines (amended 1997) in order to ascertain that the property is not structurally affected by concrete degradation.

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